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20121101
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Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)
's in boston. j. mart, if you can hear me amid the hoopla here at the newseum. you're a student at virginia, you've been e-mailing me all night about problems you're detecting in virginia. tell us the problems you see and why and what it means. >> the margins in conservative -- [inaudible] in the suburbs around richmond, chesterfield county is the biggest one, comparable to '08. in 2008 john mccain lost the commonwealth of virginia by seven points. the bottom line, barack obama can do a little bit worse across virginia and still win that state. if he wins the state, there's no path to the presidency for mitt romney. we'll get the western suburbs, look at the outer suburbs of northern virginia, the margins are comparable or a little bit better for romney than they were for mccain four years ago. so unless something big happens in the two big jurisdictions still being counted, virginia beach and fairfax up by washington, d.c., i think that the commonwealth of virginia is going to stay blue and give president obama a second term. >> republicans knew that there was trouble there, or has this al
% american. his anger growing up was the catholic church. being irish catholic in boston, he needed an anchor. he was born in east boston is a kind of local royalty. everybody knew his mother's family and his father's family. his father was a prominent politician and very well respected, very well admired. a very successful businessman. joseph kennedy went to boston. he was a star. he met with the prettiest girl in boston who also happen to be the mayor's daughter. she would later marry. there is a story of the baseball team, he was class president when he went to harvard, and again, he felt part of the community. half of his class when with him to harvard and it was only when he graduated in 1912 that he understood, for the first time and not for the last what it meant to be the irish catholic son of an east boston politician. he wanted to go into banking and finance. he didn't do the job. he didn't get a job offer. he didn't get an interview. all of his friends and classmates, some of who were not as good with numbers as he was, none of who were as articulate or charming or handsome as he w
's not my problem. seven news -- they take the news of the purchase back in the news arrives in boston so boston is the federalist territory. austin is the opposition that would surely want to deprive jefferson of any such tyamck and the way they signaled their opposition to the purchases they set off a fireworks display in celebration. this was not a controversial thing in american politics. american politicians were enthusiastic about this. the senate's starts to debate whether the ratification of the trade and treaty and the only obstacle arises is that jefferson himself gives strict instructions of the abuse of the power of government led him to play the federal government does not have the power to acquire territory. he starts to him and hans is needed constitutional amendment to give the government this power. napoleon who had overthrown -- >> host: and institutionalist. >> guest: not likely to be impressed and he starts making arguments. i will just revoke the treaty. it's not even ratified yet. madison comes to jefferson -- >> host: who is the secretary of state. >> guest: madison
with president obama from chicago, and mitt romney in boston, plus key house and senate victory and concession speeches from across the country, and throughout the night, your reaction by phone, e-mail, facebook and twitter. live coverage starts at 8:00 p.m. eastern on c-span, c-span radio, and c-span.org. >> up next, author and lecturer kenneth defense. the acclaimed author about the "don't know much about" source, talks about michiganology, geography and more. he has written 12 adult nonfiction books, including america's hidden history, a nation rising, and don't know much about the american presidents. >> host: where did the "don't know much about" series come from? >> guest: the idea came from my own little brain, although it didn't start out as a series. it started out with the idea i loved american history. i wanted to write about it in a way that shared my enthusiasm for a subject that i've loved since i was small child. the title came, of course, from sam cook's wonderful song, which i knew from childhood, and so it got stuck in my head, and certainly the success of the book, which cau
the news of the purchase back. it arrived in boston. boston is federalist territory, the opposition for the jefferson administration. the opposition that would want to deprive jefferson of the triumphs, and how they signal the opposition to the purchase is set off a fireworks display. it was not a throaferl -- controversial thing. american politicians were enthusiastic about this. news gets to washington, and the senate starts to debate whether the ratification of the treaty, and the only major obstacle to the purchase then arises is that jefferson, himself, strict views of the power of the federal government led him to believe that the federal government did not have the power to acquire territory, and he starts to hem and haw and say what we need is a constitutional amendment to give the government this power. now, napolian in france overthrew his government. he was not likely would be impressed by the argument. he makes noises saying, look, i'll just revoke the treaty. it's not been ratified yet. madison, our baseline alternative, comes to jefferson -- >> host: the secretary of s
in chicago and the mitt romney in boston. victory and concession speeche speeches,. >> we are engaged in the process and been working first in with fema, to make an overall assessment, that 25, up to 25% of those cell towers were disabled during this process. what the fcc does and will continue to do is to work with these entities, to assess the situation on the ground and to more so use this information to see where we can do adequate for. >> commissioner mignon clyburn on issues facing the commission as a year and. tonight at eight eastern on c-span2. >> tomorrow night watch election results from the presidential race as well as house, senate and governors contests across the country. we will have coverage a president obama in chicago and the mitt romney in boston. victory and concession speeches from candidates, plus your reaction of the election results throughout the night by phone, imo, facebook and twitter. live coverage begins tomorrow night at eight eastern on c-span, c-span radio in c-span.org. >> a look now at some other house races. we recently interviewed nathan gonzales,
in boston they reached their agreement on their teachers' union contract, and they have been fighting over for the past two years, and their contract that they just agreed to in boston is very similar to what is on the table in chicago. but boston has a no-strike clause. and even though they've been fighting over it for two years, they got a mediator from washington, d.c. to come in and work with these folks, work with both sides. they settled this thing. at the end of the day, no kids lost time, you know, out of the classroom. we're at the point now where -- and i believe -- that we need to evaluate these educational proposals based on one simple yardstick: will this help a child learn? and if the answer is yes, we should be for it. if the answer is no, we should be against it. so what will it take to change the dynamic? well, you know, there are a couple of things here. the solutions lie in, of course, accountability and quality teachers and autonomy. but, you know, one of the solutions also is parent choice. you know, i see as i go around the country that the more participants step up -
a bounty for indian scalps, went back, scalped them, and went to boston where she was a hero in. they erected a statue to her, the first statue of a woman showed her with a hatchet in one hand and scalp l in the other. >> kenneth davis, taking your questions, and the most recent, "don't know much about american presidents," watch live on booktv on c-span2. >> just a few minutes ago, i called vice president bush and congratlated him on his victory. i know i speak to you that he'll be our president, and we'll work with him. this nation faces major challenges ahead, and we must work together. >> i've just received a telephone call from governor decaucus. [cheers and applause] i want you to know that he was most gracious. his call was personal. it was genuinely friendly, and it was great tradition of american politics. .. >> if you're a registered voter, you have a choice to make this year. among three candidates on election day. the polls are accurate, every vote will matter. this race is considered a tossup too close to call. if you are undecided tonight come in the next hour may
with a philadelphia investment accounting firm, cook and dealer was bought by a boston financial firm, united asset management which ed eventually ran. from there he became chairman and ceo of delaware investments, a mutual management co. and next he was called in to run putnam investments in boston, even larger mutual-fund management firm that has experienced regulatory failings by the previous management. he righted that ship and eventually sold a good price for shareholders to large canadian financial firm. it was at that time we approach ed to run freddie. freddie and fanny, together with broader issues of u.s. government in housing finance is one of the major unfinished pieces of business in financial regulatory reform. is clearly an important issue. we have c-span here tonight filming this. ed has a unique perspective, the perspective of an experienced manager on the frontline and a most thoughtful public policy participant. this evening he is going to talk about where the g s es have been and what to do with them. my great pleasure to introduce ed haldeman. [applause] >> thanks so much for t
through on the old ideas that never seem to go anywhere. and he really has. i was on a panel in boston before the election with a guy named charlie baker who is a republican. he ran for governor in 2010 and got hasted by duval patrick here to see republican who lost that year. but he had read my book and he said his take away was to stuff, whether you're on the right or the left and i do think that is an implicit message of this book. i get asked all the time at events like this, how did obama screwed the politics about? how come people think the stimulus created jobs think that elvis is alive, which is actually true. it was first of all say that this black guy whose middle name is hussein and got himself elected of the united states probably didn't become a political on january 20, 2009, but he did this unbelievably unpopular stimulus. then he didn't even more on popular auto bailout. he didn't even more unpopular health care reform. meanwhile he's doing his controversial things in iraq, doing stuff in and, getting us into libya, and making statements about marriage. there's financial
is in chicago, and mitt romney in boston. we'll focus on the more competitive senate seats and taking reaction throughout the night by phone, e-mail, facebook, and twitter with live coverage beginning at eight eastern on c-span c-span radio, and c-span.org. >> when i watch c-span, i like the morning journal, the give and take there, the balanced approach, and i also like to hear the callers. never called myself, but i like hearing the callers. some of them are unusual to say the least, others thought provoking. c-span is everywhere. in washington, every event, you know, small hearings, public policy meeting downtown, c-span just seems to be there. >> steve austin watching c-span on verizon. c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979 brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >>> up next, former presidential candidate ralph nader on his book "17 solutions: bold ideas for america's future" looking at the political and cosh -- landscape and issues facing the country. the independent candidate for president in 2004 and 2008 discusses tax reform, the reduction of the
staff certainly said one thing but in boston at the romney headquarters my god was sensing a lot of confidence coming out of that building. unlike mr. romney and did have a concession speech prepared for this event as we thought through what the conversation would be like depending on the scenario but i had a few questions on election night. the first was remembering exactly what it felt like in 2004, where we had a dozen constitutional amendments passed all across the country. you had karl rove celebrated as the architect hewitt just built a new kind of republican electoral majority that would have legs in traction for a decade or two. you had a president who was reelected, not because of that within the toolkit was the use of the wedge issue, gay, gays and lgbt couples across the country. the dark and sort of fetal position and what i sensed on election night this year is how proud i am about our resilience. we picked ourselves up and we decided to fight and decided to start talking to republicans. we decided to demand more from our great democratic front. a lot of movements co
and made her way to boston. they actually erected a statue to her. the first statue, showed her with a hatchet in one hand and scalps in the other. >> army chief of staff, general ray odierno talked about how the military is prepared for the future. he discussed the challenge of maintaining the readiness of smaller troop levels in the shift out of iraq and afghanistan. the center for strategic and international studies hosted this hour-long event. [inaudible conversations] >> years ago -- [inaudible] auditorium at a podium. >> the microphone isn't on. [inaudible] >> welcome to the center for strategic and international studies. that sounds real. good morning welcome to everyone in the room. welcome to viewers on the web this morning. i am david berteau, director of international security program here at the host for the military strategy for them. we've been doing these for them for a dozen years now almost and it's due in great part to the generous sport of north america and we thank you for that support without which we could do this program. it is a pleasure for us to have wi
in boston. plus key house and senate victory concession speeches across the country. throughout the night, your reaction by phone, e-mail, facebook, and twitter. live coverage starts at 8:00 p.m. eastern on c-span, c-span radio, and c-span.org. now a debate for the u.s. senate senate in wyoming between senator john, democratic challenger. and joe. the debate courtesy of wyoming pbs. it's about an hour. >> moderator: first candidate is going to be a joe otto. give me a moment. there's a complication. he's lives -- open the family ranch. he worked as a design engineer and was active in the republican and libertarian parties before joining the country party. our democratic party candidate tim chest nut he is worked extension lively as a professional photographer and as a staff member of our regional services which provides assistance to go only disabled. and the republican party candidate is senator john. he's a physician and a former president of the wyoming medical society. he was opponented to the u.s. senate in 2011, and re-elected to that post in 2008. he is a member of several senate c
of massachusetts and made more u-turns in a boston cabdriver in trying to to get to where he was. when you look at the results of this election you can draw a direct connection between the policies president obama has led on and the voting support he got. if on the face of this republicans decide what they really need to do is to go back and do it even more conservative again, far be it from me to persuade them otherwise. we have another election four years, but it would not be wise. >> on the religion question, i agree with blaise and ann but i would add one thing. if you look at the polling of people who said they would be less likely to vote for a candidate because they were a mormon, the majority of those people thought barack obama is a muslim who was born in kenya. so it's the demographic. it wasn't there to make it a negative but it is true that democrats make it an issue. >> some of the positions romney took during the primaries really hurt specifically with regard to immigration reform. i think newt gingrich said that romney was the most conservative on that issue and in a country wher
-choice governor of massachusetts. since then you make more u-turns in a boston cab driver to train ticket to the place where he was. when you look at the results of this election and as they say come you can try a direct connection to the policies, president obama has led them to voting support is in the face of this. the republicans decide that they need to do and do it even more conservative again to try to persuade them otherwise. it wouldn't be wise. >> on the religion question, i agree with blaise and ann, but if you look at the polling is that they be less to vote for a candidate because they were mormon, majority of those people thought barack obama is a muslim born in kenya. so the demographic was in the air to make a negative, but it is true that democrats did not make it an issue and that's a good thing. >> some of the positions romney took during the primaries specifically with regard to immigration reform. i think was newt gingrich has said romney was most conservative on that issue and in the country where that's the fastest growing bloc of voters. it's really not a good poli
since then, they make more u-turns than a boston cab driver trying to get to the place where he was. when you look at the results of this election come you can try connect connection between policies president obama has led on a devoted support he got. if in the face republicans decide what they need to do is go back and do it even more conservative again, far be it for me to persuade them otherwise. we got another election in four years. i can levitate, but it wouldn't be wise. >> on the religion question i agree was blaise entry into. if you look at the polling of people less likely to vote for a candidate because they were more men, the majority of his people thought barack obama is a muslim who was born in canada country in kenya. it wasn't there to make it a negative, but it is true democrats did not make it an issue. >> some of the positions from me to turn the primaries really hurt specifically with regard to immigration reform. it is newt gingrich is that romney was the most conservative on that issue in any country where it is the fastest-growing bloc of voters, that's real
one thing and i live in boston near the romney headquarters of my gut was sensing a lot of confidence coming out of that building. i did have a concession speech prepared for this event as we thought through what this conversation would be like depending on the scenario but i had a few quick questions on election night. the first was remembering exactly what it felt like in 2043 had a dozen constitutional amendments passed in the state all across the country. you had karl rove celebrated as the architect who had just built a new kind of republican electoral majority that would have laid the attraction for a decade or two and you had a president who was reelected not because of within the toolkit was the wedge issue lgbt families across the country. a dark moment, kind of the fetal movement for the lgbt movement and what i really sensed on election night this year was how proud i am about our resilience. we picked ourselves up and we decided to fight ends day and decided to start talking to republicans. we decided to demand more from our great democratic friends. a lot of movements cou
. >> the staff said one thing, but i live in boston, and there were romney headquarters, and my gut was something things. i didn't have a concession speech, unlike mitt romney, prepared for this event, as we thought through what this would be like depending on the scenario. i had a few reflections on election night. the first was remembering what it felt like in 2004 where you had a dozen constitutional amendments passed in states all across the country. you had the new republican electoral majority, and you had a president who is reelected not because of, but within the toolkit of the issues, a dark moment, this position for the lgbt movement. i would like to say how proud i am about our resilience. we picked ourselves. we decided to fight and start talking to republicans. we decided to demand more from our democratic friends. a lot of movements that have stayed down and then victims for the next decade. like some people predicted. the sense of pride in our resilience and strength, the second reflection is that on election night in 2008, i had spent time at that campaign headquarters for todd ak
here. >> hike in the stephen flynn from northeastern university in boston. on the issue of new normal, i wonder picking up on david's point about the price to post-9/11, is the sort of coming to grips with the hubris we could prevent bad things from happening, this huge investment in the post-secular world arabic ere we could ideally stop risk. actually coping with that is what we really need to increase and maybe just bring it very close to home. we just had this bashing mother nature in the area, priced at around $60 billion for a risk above the basic things like when you have tunnels that are only seven feet above water. it fills up the hole and you end up with 86 million gallons of oil in the tunnel and that's not hard to predict. putting safeguards in place in recovering this may be one element of this. basically the issue is that we focus too much on trying to prevent risk instead of managing it better? >> steve tried to argue for solace, which is an interesting concept. yes, back here. >> richard downey from the center for hemispheric u.s. david, you mentioned in the election t
called him -- [inaudible] now i love boston, and i went to school up there and high school there's a lot of smart people thereupon. i resented the fact that people in the north think that people in texas are deserving of terms like -- i don't know about you it kind of upsets me. because we do have people that, you know, are a little, you know, capable of doings things including the then president of the united states lyndon johnson. in a six week period kept the kennedy team because it was essential to be able to keep the momentum going on the agenda that stalled for three years, effectively. he kept the kennedy team which showed the leadership skills of humility. he the leadership skill of dogged determination to create and he the skills of creating a strategy. he implement ploymented in a six-week period a 25% across the board cut in income tabses. the idea was to cut taxes to raise revenue to going fund the great society programs. he went to the senate, which was oppose to the ultimately goal of, you know, significance civil rights legislation and convinced the dean of the senate, who
-- [inaudible] i love boston there a lot of smart people there. i resented the fact that people in the north think that people in texas are disperving of terms like -- [inaudible] i know about you but it upsets me. we have people that are a little capable of doing things including the then president of the united states lyndon johnson. in a six-week period kept the kennedy team because it was a essential to be able to keep the momentum going on the agenda that had stalled for three years effectively. he kept the kennedy team which showed the leadership kills humility. he the leadership skill of dogged determination to create and he had the skill of creating a strategy and implemented in aics-week period a 125% across the board cut in tax rates. believe it or not as a liberal democrat the idea was to cut taxes to raise rev now fund the great society program. he went to the senate, which was opposed to the ultimately goal of, you know, significant in the legislation and convince the dean of the senate, who was the budget chair that he would commit to a tbhawment year to year a decrees. not lik
on this gragraduate degree, he is workig at a domestic violence shelter in boston. harvard awarded him the thomas upton scholarship. pierre recently wrote an article about growing up as undocumented immigrant and here what is he said. "i am not a criminal, a monito , a predator, or swung had sits at someone doing nothing meaningful. i care for this country, as well as its sorrows and joys. i am not asking that our government maintain an open-door policy for immigrants. i am simply asking that it give an opportunity to those of us who have proven ourselves." well, pierre is right. america needs young people just like him who love their country and are dedicated to caring for our society's most vulnerable. so what do the american people think about the idea of the dream act? a bloomberg poll found that 64% of likely voters, almost two out of three, including 66% of independents support the policy compared to only 30% who oppose it. by a margin of 2-1 the american people know this is the right thing to do. now we need to pass a comprehensive immigration reform. on our side the negotiating effort wil
and made her way to boston where she was a. the first statute to an american woman, a permit statue shutter with a hatchet in one hand and scalps in the other. >> hurricanes and he is now believed to be one of the costliest natural disasters with insured losses estimated to be as much as $20 billion. we discussed the national flood insurance program and how the insurance companies are responding to sandy with an industry representative. this is a half-hour. postcode let me introduce you to john prible, vice president of the independent insurance agents and brokers of america. our topic is the national insurance program. mr. purple, this article was in "the wall street journal" yesterday ensures market bubble tab. what's the responsibility when it comes to recovering from sandy? >> guest: sure, that article and a hand like really captures exactly what is going on. so when a typical insurance event for a hurricane, there's going to be damage caused by wind, wind storm damage, fallen trees. you see in the news media there's going to be fires or natural gas lines. all of this damage will be cov
takes command of the continental army he goes to boston and sees black men with guns and knows he's not going to build a self this to his brethren south carolina and georgia. he stops that. eventually he changed his mind when he needed more bodies and his army peer we always have to weigh these things. they are not black-and-white issues. he was a man of his time, part of the society utterly dependent on slavery and knew he was not going to change the minds of his fellow slaveholders. we point to these founding fathers and genuinely with admiration. but this was clearly where they did not see the great conflagration that was coming. how still out c. davis is the author on "in depth" on booktv on c-span 2. a better after we have with some questions have been preapproval shape as now. we have an hour and half program. we'll be right back. >> host: and we're back live with kenneth davis, author and historian in new york city. this is booktv on c-span 2. mr. davis come you say when it comes to your career, your writing career that she give a lot of credit to join davis. who is that? >
will have coverage of obama in chicago and mitt romney in boston. we are focused on some of the more competitive senate seats. plus, your reaction throughout the night by phone, e-mail, facebook, and twitter. live coverage begins at 8:00 p.m. eastern. next we take you to arizona for u.s. senate debate between republican jeff flake and democratic candidate richard carmona. they are vying for the senate seat left open by jon kyl. courtesy of kawc radio. >> welcome to the debate on the campus on school of arizona, yuma. we will begin with 92nd opening statements from jeff flake and trento. they will take questions from a panel of journalists related to life outside the metropolitan areas. built into the schedule is an additional four minutes, should the moderator or panelists have a follow-up. we have news director anna chaulk, joyce lobeck and michelle faust. joining us today are over 300 residents. they have agreed to respect the candidates and listened silently during the debate with the exception of right now. ladies and gentlemen, help me welcome congressman jeff flake and doctor r
of the continental army goes up to boston, sees that there are black men with guns and knows he is not going to be able to sell this to his brethren in south carolina and georgia. he stops that. eventually changes his mind when he needed more bodies in his army. we always have to weigh these things. they are not simple black-and-white issues. yes he was a man of his times, he was a man who was part of a society that was utterly dependent upon slavery and he knew he was not going to change the minds of his fellow slaveholders. we point to these founding fathers and genuinely with admiration, but this was clearly where they did not see the great conflagration that "don't know much about literature: what you need to know but never learned about great books and authors" >> host: kenneth davis is our guest. every offer we have on in depth we ask some questions of them and we are going to show use those now. we have an hour-and-a-half left in our program and we will be right back with your phone calls. >> host: we are live with kenneth davis, author and historian in new york city, this is booktv o
e-mails, i am disappointed -- when i went to work for the mayor of boston i was told seriously there's one thing you got to remember. you have -- never talk when you can not and never not when you can wind. why these two intelligent men rescinding these embarrassing e-mails is baffling. did they not know, talk about white collar crime, that no one would be indicted if it would not for e-mails. i am sorry for the general david petraeus family. there does not appear to be any public policy relevance to this. i am sorry people are fussing over it. >> it is a major public policy f they cause -- do you think the democrats have a mandate to get that type of revenue through? when you look at this election -- >> and doing one part of the george bush tax cuts which were adopted after a president got a plurality of half a million votes. if-half a million give you a mandate to put the tax cuts in than 3.3 million plus ought to give you a mandate to put them out. >> how much of the president's vote the you think was about taxes and the argument that he made about higher taxes versus all of his o
in boston. plus key house and senate victory and concession speeches from across the country. and throughout the night your reaction by phone, e-mail, facebook and twitter. live coverage starts at 8 p.m. eastern on c-span, c-span radio and c-span.org. >> we continue our campaign 2012 coverage with the look at a u.s. house race in new york. freshman congresswoman ann marie buerkle debates dan maffei. it's hosted by wcny in liverpool, new york. ♪ >> moderator: well, good evening, everyone, i'm dan cummings, and welcome. we're very glad you're with us. on tuesday central new yorkers in four counties will choose a representative for congress, the newly-drawn 24th congressional district. let's take a look at the 24th. that district now includes the counties shaded in light blue. all of wayne county and roughly the western half of aswego county. if you are a registered voter in that light blue-shaded area in the 24th, you have a choice to make this year among three candidates on election day, and if the polls are accurate, every vote will matter because this race is considered a toss-up, too clo
to boston had their service interrupted. dozens and dozens of new jersey transit locomotives and rail cars were damaged by flooding. and so today i'm proud to announce that we expedited $25 million in transportation funding to help ease that situation. but some commuters into new york, for example, from my home state of new jersey are still suffering four-hour commutes with rail service only about half of what it normally is, largely because there's still not enough power for all the trains. in the meantime, new jersey has added subsidized ferry service to make up the difference with the department of transportation providing over 300 -- the federal department of transportation providing over 300 buses to help serve those new ferry lines, including one out of liberty state park. here's another photograph of the extraordinary power that sandy's surge lifted boats on to the rail bridge along the north jersey coastline. amazingly, through the hard work of new jersey transit workers, this devastated rail line might be able to resume limited service by the end of this week. but this line, like
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)